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Buy Smart Advertising that Works!

When disasters happen, customers need help immediately. That's why they call the first name that comes to mind. RESTORATION MEDIA MARKETING will help make sure that name is yours.

About Restoration Media

At one time, referrals from insurance agents and adjusters brought plenty of business to restoration companies. However, today's preferred vendor programs often put that responsibility in the hands of the insured.

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So who will they call when disasters happen? Most likely the first name that comes to mind. Restoration Media Marketing wants to make that name yours. Name recognition and trust are critical to building your business.

It's called brand awareness, and Restoration Media Marketing has proven tools to help you increase it. We make it happen with targeted media messages and professional media buying services.

Marketing Pros and Cons

How do I know which Media to use?

Mass media is new to many restoration contractors. Here is a quick guide to helping you understand the pros and cons of the most popular advertising mediums.

Pros

  • On the air television reaches virtually all (98%) of U.S. households.
  • Within this broad reach, research enables us to zero in on specific programs we know our target market is watching.
  • On average, viewers watch television/cable/VCR/DVD combined 8.5 hours per day.
  • Television has the ability to grab attention and create appeal through a combination of high-quality sight and sound.
  • Television is unmatched in its ability to illicit an emotional connection to the product.
  • Broad reach potential in the target audience.
  • High frequency potential for specific target segments.

Cons

  • Audience share is declining with VCR/DVD, cable and satellite viewing.
  • The average TV household can receive 43 channels. With all the viewing choices, advertisers are finding it increasingly difficult to reach consumers at an effective level of message frequency.
  • When a commercial comes on, many viewers go surfing (so commercials must grab viewers attention immediately).
  • U.S. adults who earn $60,000 or more watch 26% less television than the average viewer. Placement is critical.
  • Almost all television viewing is done in the home, making it virtually impossible to reach consumers close to the point of purchase such as stores or fast foods.

Pros

  • Cable viewers are better educated and are typically in a higher income bracket.
  • Can better define the audience and more accurately target who to reach. Most cable homes receive 30 or more channels allowing advertisers to target specific consumer groups according to their programs of interest.
  • Can target geographically.
  • Cable ratings typically increase during the summer when over-the-air television ratings decline.

Cons

  • Cable audiences are considerable smaller than those of network television. Primetime broadcast typically reach from 7-35% of metro homes while top cable networks rarely exceed 3% during the same time period.
  • Ad clutter: Network TV typically carries a 24 unit commercial load every hour. Cable carries as many as 28 units per hour.
  • Fragmentation of cable audience makes it difficult to achieve message frequency.

Pros

  • Outdoor advertising is able to achieve extensive coverage of the market with high frequency.
  • Outdoor is the largest size print ad available and offers the advertiser great attention-getting power.
  • Rotating billboards and 30-sheets posters (A billboard with copy area measuring 9' 7" high by 21' 7" wide, about half the size of a traditional billboard) offer the opportunity to increase the potential for exposure.
  • 30-sheets posters offer the opportunity to target specific areas.
  • Billboards on main thoroughfares are lighted and offer around-the-clock exposure.

Cons

  • It is often difficult to convey your company message in a brief and simple way.
  • Prime outdoor locations are often controlled by large, long term advertisers.
  • After several times seeing the same billboard, it will become background. Therefore, billboards must be rotated often and messages changed.
  • Commuters behind the wheel are exposed very briefly to outdoor messages, minimizing message retention. Heavy traffic or bad weather can also limit message impact and recall.

Pros

  • The average American listens to radio 3 hours and 45 minutes every weekday.
  • Radio is a high frequency medium at a relatively low cost.
  • Reaches consumers closest to the point of purchase. Adds sense of immediacy.
  • Allows you to influence your best consumers and prospects all day long. Radio becomes a means of reaching them while at work and while they are traveling to and from work and on their way to retail stores.
  • Radio offers the opportunity for value added promotions.

Cons

  • Increasingly fragmented audience makes it difficult to reach a broad audience.
  • Radio is often used as a background medium, which means that advertising must quickly capture the listener's attention in order to be heard.
  • With increased demand on ratio, it is becoming difficult to break through the clutter during long commercial breaks.

Pros

  • One of the oldest, most highly regarded media in the U.S. Enjoys a high degree of familiarity, acceptance, credibility, and respect.
  • Creates visual appeal through pictures and graphics and offers a variety of ad sizes.
  • Newspaper secures the advertisers position as a local entity.
  • Reaches educated adults 25-54.
  • Sense of immediacy. Readers perception is that newspapers contain something new every day, this quality is important when introducing new products to the market.
  • Production flexibility allows copy to be changed easily and quickly and response can be tracked through couponing.

Cons

  • Declining literacy rates in many markets have sapped newspaper's claim to broad reach within the market.
  • Passive medium. Provides retail information once the decision to buy has been made, but it does not build brand awareness or create product demand.
  • Most people don't read all sections of the paper every day.
  • On average, only 42% of newspaper readers will recall noting a full page ad.
  • Newspaper doesn't accommodate selective approaches that improve cost efficiency and enhance message frequency against clearly defined, high-potential customer segments